Twice as fast as a tortoise sprinting

When a man is tired of London, he is tired of life.  For there is in London all that life can afford.

The world is a big place and the more I see of it, the more I realize there is so much to see…which is why I like to return to place later on.  Every time I return to a previously visited place, I feel like I can dig in a little deeper, get to know it a little bit better.  I can visit familiar places and discover new ones.  It’s as if I’m turning a casual acquaintance into a life long friend.

Places change; they aren’t stagnant.  People can change, grow and evolve over time and so can cities.  Take London for example.  It’s a much different place in 2000 than in was in 1000.  It’s even different than it was during my first visit in 1997.  Every time you visit a place, you get fresh eyes and new perspectives. There hasn’t been a single time that have I gone back to a place I’ve been to before and said, wow, nothing’s changed…  It’s just as I remember it.  Not once. Not ever.

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A modern marvel of London is The London Eye, first named the Millennium Wheel.  Standing on Whitehall Bridge facing Lambeth Bridge – look over your right shoulder and you see “Big Ben” and the houses of Parliament; look over your left shoulder and you see The London Eye.  Ancient and modern melding together.  This is one of the beauties of London architecture, and you find it on nearly every street corner.

On my first trip to London, the eye hadn’t even begun construction yet. [Construction began in 1998 to be finished by 2000 and to be taken down in 2005].  Now, it dominates the skyline [from certain angles].  It is a massive 443 feet tall [it is not a Ferris wheel. It’s the world’s tallest cantilevered observation wheel] and makes one revolution in a whopping 30 minutes. [Capsules travel at a leisurely pace of 26 cm per second, which is twice as fast as a tortoise sprinting] You can see up to 40 kilometres in all directions on a clear day.  The 32 capsules on the London Eye are representative of the 32 London boroughs, but despite there only being 32 capsules, for superstitious reasons they are numbered 1 – 33. For good luck number 13 is left out [Bummer for me…13 is my favorite number].

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